Glimpses of India : Summary | Free MCQ | Word Meaning

Introduction of Glimpses of India

In this article, we will read about the summary of glimpses of India. The chapter including three short stories. The first story is “A Baker from Goa” by Lucio Rodrigues. A Baker from Goa is about a baker and relates to the old Portuguese days. The second one is “Coorg” by Lokesh Abrol. It is a story about a place in Karnataka ‘Coorg’. The author had described about the weather, environment, people, wildlife, and the scenery of Coorg in this story. The last one is the “Tea from Assam” by Anup Kumar Datta. Tea from Assam is about two friends exploring the tea gardens of Assam in their tour.

Glimpses of India - English Philosophy
Glimpses of India – English Philosophy

Glimpses of India Summary

A Baker from Goa

A baker from Goa is a story that relates to the old-time when there was Portuguese rule in Goa. This story is of a baker living in a Goan village in Goa. In those times people used to ate loaves of bread. These were made in big furnaces. The bakers known as Paders would come to see these bread in the street and would make a jingle sound with the bamboo. Although, nowadays we may see the furnaces and some bakers carrying on the traditional business of their forefathers but may not see those loaves. The author remembers that the baker used to come twice a day when he was a child. He was the author’s friend and guide. The maidservants in the author’s house used to buy loaves of bread which they ate with tea.

During those days, bread was an important part of any occasion especially the sweet bread, Bol. Also, the baker had a peculiar dress, Kabai. It was a single–piece frock that would reach up to knees. We saw bakers wearing a shirt and trousers which were shorter than full-length ones and longer than half pants in childhood days. Even today, anyone who wears a half pant that reaches just below the knees can have the comment that he is dressed like a padar!

Baking was a profitable business at that time.

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Coorg

Coorg is a story describing the Coorg or Kodagu city, the smallest district of Karnataka state. In this story The author describes Coorg as a heavenly place that lies between Mangalore and Mysore city. It is certainly God’s abode as it has mostly evergreen forests, spices, and coffee plantations sites. From the month of September to March, the weather is quite pleasant here and thus many tourists come to visit the place ‘Coorg’.

The author described that The air here has the coffee aroma in it. There’s a famous story about the greek or Arabic descent of the Coorg people that were once the part of Alexander’s army had to settle here as it was not possible for them to return to their native place. They thus settled here and married the locals. We may find people of Coorg wear Kuppia, a long black coat similar to the kuffia that Arabs wear. 

The people of Coorg are also very brave. The Coorg Regiment of the Indian Army is one of the most significant regiments. Also, our first army chief, General Cariappa hails from the pleasant city Coorg. The forests and hills of Coorg provide a major source of water to the River Cauvery. Also, Mahaseer, the largest freshwater of fish is found in these waters. From the top of the Brahmagiri hills, we can see the complete view of Coorg. Also, Buddhists monks live in Bylakuppe on the Island of Nisargadhma near Coorg.

Tea From Assam

The last story is Tea from Assam starts with two friends, Rajiv and Pranjol traveling to Assam. On their way to visit the tea garden in Assam, they buy the tea from a roadside vendor. While sipping the tea, Rajiv tells Pranjol the people drink approximately over 800,000,000 cups of tea throughout the world in a day. While Rajiv is looking at the beautiful and serene scenery, Pranjol is busy reading a detective book. There were tea bushes all over as far as one could see. They also saw a building which was a tea garden.

Assam has the largest tea plantations and no one knows who discovered the tea for the first time. But, there are many legends associated with it. According to a Chinese legend, a few branches of tea fell accidentally in the boiled water. The Emperor liked the delicious flavor. This is how it came into being. As per an Indian legend, Buddhist Monk, Bodhidharma cut off his eyelids to avoid sleep during meditation.

About ten tea plants grew from those eyelids and thus, they banish sleep when put in hot water and drunk. Both of them got down at Mariani Junction and went to Dhekiabari tea Estate. There they saw women plucking tea leaves. Pranjol’s father had come to receive them there and said that he knew a lot about tea plantations. Rajiv says that he is keen to learn from him.

Also Read : English Grammar Topics

Glimpses of India question answer

Glimpses of India MCQ questions and answers

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Glimpses of India - MCQ

Glimpses of India - MCQ

1 / 25

Which name is used for the sweet bread?

2 / 25

Who is the author of “Coorg”?

3 / 25

Pranjol was busy reading ---.

4 / 25

The bakers used to wear

5 / 25

Dhekiabari Tea Estate was managed by –

6 / 25

The best season to visit Coorg is:

7 / 25

The Coorgi prople are famous for the tradition of:

8 / 25

The train reached at –

9 / 25

How many cups of tea are drunk everyday throught the world?

10 / 25

The baker used to come daily.

11 / 25

Who was General Cariappa?

12 / 25

There were bakers especially found in India?

13 / 25

Who ruled over Goa?

14 / 25

What type of people are bakers?

15 / 25

Coorgs are decent of:

16 / 25

Rajvir and Pranjol go to Assam by:

17 / 25

Tea was first consumed in –

18 / 25

The freshwater fish of Coorg is:

19 / 25

Coorg is famous for its:

20 / 25

In olden days baker in Goa was known as:

21 / 25

What is Nisargadhama?

22 / 25

____is known as tea country.

23 / 25

Pranjol was traveling with his friend, named –

24 / 25

When were the bills collected?

25 / 25

Pranjol asked for ……. cup/cups tea from the vendor.

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